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Cosmos bipinnatus - Cav.

Cosmos

AuthorCav. Botanical references43, 200
FamilyCompositae GenusCosmos
Synonyms
Known HazardsNone known
RangeSouthern N. America - Mexico.
HabitatRoadsides and waste places[43].
Edibility Rating 0 (1-5) Medicinal Rating 0 (1-5)

Physical Characteristics

icon of man icon of perennial/biennial/annual Annual growing to 1m.
It is hardy to zone 9. It is in flower from August to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). It is noted for attracting wildlife.

The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

Habitats

Cultivated Beds;

Edible Uses

None known

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

None known

Other Uses

None known

Cultivation details

Succeeds in a sunny sheltered position in most soils[175] but prefers one that is poor and light[108]. A very ornamental plant[200], the flowers are very attractive to bees[108]. There are many named forms selected for their ornamental value[200].

Propagation

Seed - sow March in a greenhouse. The seed usually germinates in 5 - 7 days at 20 - 25c[164]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in early summer. Especially in areas with hot summers, the seed can also be sown in situ in May[164].

Cultivars

There are some named forms for this species, but these have been developed for their ornamental value and not for their other uses. Unless you particularly require the special characteristics of any of these cultivars, we would generally recommend that you grow the natural species for its useful properties. We have, therefore, not listed the cultivars in this database[K].

Links

References

[K] Ken Fern
Notes from observations, tasting etc at Plants For A Future and on field trips.

[43] Fernald. M. L. Gray's Manual of Botany. American Book Co. 1950
A bit dated but good and concise flora of the eastern part of N. America.

[108] International Bee Research Association. Garden Plants Valuable to Bees. International Bee Research Association. 1981
The title says it all.

[164] Bird. R. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 4. Thompson and Morgan. 1990
Very readable magazine with lots of information on propagation. A good article on Yuccas, one on Sagebrush (Artemesia spp) and another on Chaerophyllum bulbosum.

[175] Bird. R. (Editor) Focus on Plants. Volume 5. (formerly 'Growing from seed') Thompson and Morgan. 1991
Very readable magazine with lots of information on propagation. A good article on Corydalis spp.

[200] Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press 1992 ISBN 0-333-47494-5
Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed.

 

 

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